What you may not be knowing is that The Queen’s House in Greenwich, London, is not exactly where HM the Queen Elizabeth lives in or ever lived as a matter of fact. Surely she has better places to live in such as the Buckingham Palace and Windsor Palace to keep making other queens green with envy so why bother living in Greenwich for heaven’s sake? Well, interestingly the Queen’s House built between 1616 and 1635 is located in the south-east of London and was commissioned for Anne of Denmark, the Queen of King James I. So London has more delights beyond Buckingham Palace only.
A Saturday In Queen's House
Queen’s House Greenwich

A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's HouseA Saturday In Queen's HouseA Saturday In Queen's HouseA Saturday In Queen's HouseA Saturday In Queen's HouseA Saturday In Queen's HouseA Saturday In Queen's HouseA Saturday In Queen's HouseA Saturday In Queen's House

A Saturday In Queen's House

In close proximity of the Greenwich observatory which proudly labels itself to be the hosting ground of the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT), the timeless piece of architecture designed by Inigo Jones stays embodied in the beautiful Queen’s House. Last weekend we realised that fate handed us over some lemons only so we decided to make lemonades instead, as it was such a terrible weather with rain and drizzling all day long. In such a day, one could only get equal with nature by visiting numerous London museums which are also for free. While the rain will fall, you will continue to rise while enriching your experience and knowledge.
A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House
The Queen’s House at Greenwich – Our preferred destination for that gloomy and rainy Saturday and we were left thoroughly impressed with the unique designs of this classical British architecture. Especially the Tulip Stairs was a delight to climb up (only half-way through). This was indeed how stairways to heaven should look like.The Tulip Stairs are one of the Queen’s House’s original features. Designed by Inigo Jones, England’s first notable architect, the staircase was Britain’s first geometric self-supporting spiral stair. It’s now thought the ‘tulips’ are in fact fleur de lis. 
A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's HouseA Saturday In Queen's House
However, rumor has it that the Queen’s House is haunted as a group of Canadian tourists saw ghosts appearing in their photograph taken at the Tulip Stairs. No evidence had been found to support this claim but many people later claimed to have seen ghostly figures roaming around in the house. We also obviously didn’t see, but you can try to see if you can spot any in our photos here?
A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House
May be other than resident ghosts of the Queens from centuries ago, the house hosts numerous rooms with wall paintings, furniture and royal items from the yesteryear. The special marble flooring with black and white geometric patterns reflect design preferences Inigo Jones had in mind. Interestingly, one could also see the River Thames uninterrupted from the front windows of the house because this was done as per the wish of Queen Mary who wanted to see the river unobstructed from inside the House.
A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House
Beautiful colonnades connect the main Queen’s House with two extensions on both the sides including one to the Royal Maritime Museum which itself was abuzz with tourists and locals alike. Displaying exhibitions and histories on the maritime history of the UK, the museum turned out to be a delight for those interested in all things sea and ocean and the ships and the sailors who left or arrived at the UK shores. Even walking down the corridor with the Greenwich Observatory in one hand and the Royal Naval Colleges on the other hand along with the River Thames – perhaps was one of the best short walks one could experience in London.
A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's Househttp://www.newlook.com/shop/result?Ntt=peep+toe+mules&filtered=1 A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House
While returning to the Cutty Sark DLR station, we thought to seek some refuge from the deluge from the sky by getting into the happening Greenwich Market. A seriously vibrant and diverse kind of market featuring foods, jewelry, clothing, gift items and much more. Well protected from rain or hail under the sun-roof above, the market provided a fitting conclusion to our weekend exploration.
A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House A Saturday In Queen's House
What Was I Wearing?
H&M Culottes
Zara Jumper
Newlook Shoes (Alternative linked)
Zara Bag
H&M Earring
 
0

You May Also Like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *